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April 1894

"The Indispensable Apron"

During the past two years the wearing of aprons has increased, though not to such an extent as was the custom in our grandmothers' days. Besides using them from an economical point of view and because of a desire to present a tidy appearance, they are worn often from the coquettish idea that they will impart an air of womanliness that will prove attractive to masculine eyes, and that they give the wearer the appearance of a busy housewife. At first aprons were intended merely to save the dress and for use, but now they are made ornamental as well, as is shown by their adoption by young ladies when pouring the tea.

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 The Materials Used

 For Nurse and Waitress

  For Afternoon Teas

 For Fancy-Work

 For General Wear

 Aprons for Artists

 The Dressmaker's Apron

 The Clerk and Typewriter

 For Kitchen Wear

 What Children Wear

 Aprons for Young Girls

Bibliographical Information:
Hooper, Emma M. "The Indispensable Apron",
The Ladies' Home Journal, Vol. XI, No. 5, April 1894, p. 27.

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Disclaimer: This article is being presented as an educational resource of fashions during this era. The Costume Gallery, or its owner, Penny E. Dunlap Ladnier, does NOT sell or make sewing patterns. This publication's text is in its original format. Spelling or grammar may not appear to be correct, but were standard for the original publication date.

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