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Ladies Indispensable Assistant

Author: E. Hutchinson

A Book Copyrighted in 1852

THE LADY'S WORK-BOX

Areas of Work:

Framing | Prep for Stitching | Embroidery Stitches

Beadwork | Rug Bordering | Costume Accessories

Household Accessories

 

This presentation of the Ladies Indispensable Assistant has been made possible by loan from Making Time costume design.

Visit other areas of this book:

 

 Ladies Toilette Table

 Directions for Coloring Garments

 

 Etiquette for Ladies and Gentlemen

 VINTAGE PUBLICATIONS INDEX

 

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PREPARATION OF FRAMES

To dress a frame for Cross Stitch

The canvass must be hemmed neatly around: then count your threads and place the centre one exactly in the middle of the frame. The canvass much be drawn as tight as the screws or pegs will permit, and if too long, is should be wrapped around the poles wit tissue paper, to keep it from dust, and the friction of the arms, as that is essential to the beauty of the work. It must in all cases be rolled under, or it will occasion much trouble in the working. When laced quite even in the frame, secure, by fine twine passes over the stretchers and thought the canvass, very closely; both sides must be tightened gradually or it will draw to one side, and the work will be spoiled.

 

 

To dress a frame for Cloth Work

Stretch your cloth in the frame as tight as possible, the right side uppermost.

The canvass on which you intend to work must be of a size to correspond with the patter, and must be places exactly in the centre of the cloth to which it is to be secured, as smooth as possible. When the work is finished, the canvass must be cut, and the threads drawn out, first one way and then the other. It is necessary to be especially careful, in working, not the split the threads, as that would prevent them drawing, and would spoil the appearance of the work. In all cases it is advisable to place the cloth so as that the nap may go downward. In working bouquets of flowers, this rule is indispensable. The patterns for cloth work should be light and open. It looks well for sofas, arm chairs, &c., but is by no means so durable as work done with wool entirely on canvass.

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Handwork

Materials for Working

Canvass (coarse) eighteen threads to the inch. Work in cross stitch with double wool. This is proper for a foot-stool, sofa-pillow, &c.

Canvass (very coarse) then threads to the inch. Work in cress stitch, over one thread, with single wool. If used for grounding, work in two threads. This will accelerate the work, and look equally well.

Perforated Card

The needles must not be too large, or the holes will be liable to get broken. The smaller ones must be worked in silk; the larger patterns may be done either in silk or wool. Sometimes the flowers are worked in Chenille, and the leaves in silk; this gives to card cases, &c., a beautiful and highly ornamental appearance.

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STITCHES

Tent Stitch

This is accomplished over one thread the cross way, and should be done in a frame. In grounding, perform the work the bias way of the canvass and work from left to right.

Cross Stitch

Let the wool be put across two threads, and the needle down two, working the cross way, and finishing as the work progresses.

Straight Cross Stitch

This stitch is the same as Cross Stitch, but is worked the straight way of the canvass; and although on coarse canvass, has a very pleasing and finished appearance.

Windsor Stitch

Pass the wool over six threads straight, and six threads down, which will present a square when the section row is completed.

Pavilion Stitch

Four threads having been taken straight down, bring the needle down one thread; after that take two threads, then four as before, and finish the row, Commence the second row with a stitch in two threads, then take four and so proceed. Gold beads tastefully introduced have a very pretty effect.

Josephine Stitch

This is a very pretty stitch for bags with gold or silver braids, and is executed in stripes from the bottom to the top. Take six threads straight, and proceed to the end of the row; after which take three length of braid, and work one of them in Cross Stitch, diamond fashion.

Berlin Stitch

Work this stitch in a scallop, taking six threads straight down. Much of the beauty of it depends upon the contrast of color (having an eye to harmony) in the threads. The effect should be ascertained before beginning the work.

Czar Stitch

We have heard this called Economic Stitch. It is worked over from six or eight threads in depth, and two in width crossed from right to left. Gold thread should be interposed between each row.

Irish Stitch

Four, six, or eight threads are to be taken straight, two threads being left between. The second roe is to be begun four threads up, between the two threads left in the former row; take care that the stitched meet the first row. This is a valuable stitch, easily worked into a variety of pretty forms.

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Bead Work

Use the canvass called bolting; and work two threads each way on the slant, with china silk, taking especial care that the beads are all turned the same way, that the whole may appear uniform. Work the pattern with thick beads and ground with transparent ones. You must, in this kind of work, have as few shades as possible.

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Rug Bordering

When we descend into the arena of domestic utility, it is vastly surprising in how many ways the Art of Needlework adapts itself to comfort and to ornament. We may presume carpets to be too unwieldy for the management of fair fingers; but rugs come within the compass of the fair Artist's skill and taste. Many of the borderings completed by English ladies are quite equal to the labored productions if the Gobelings; as are, of course, at all times superior to these which emanate from the loom.

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COSTUME ACCESSORIES

Slippers

Are worked in embroidery, on canvass, satin or soft kid.

 Fire-Side Caps

These are worked in gems, or flowers, or velvet. Embroidery and gold braid are also adopted. There are several pieces joined together to fit the head and at the top is a handsome tassel.

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HOUSEHOLD ACCESSORIES

Gothic Chairs

For dark-framed chairs choose light patterns; tent stitch being grounded in cross stitch, as may be seen in the private apartments at Windsor Castle. Sometimes a sort of cushion is inserted in the back, and the whole is done in cloth or satin, and the canvass withdrawn. Flower embroidery, gem patterns, and braiding, are all made use of in this description of work.

Settees

These should be executed in cloth, thirty-three inches long and twenty-six wide.

Sofa Pillows

Work the squares of canvass with flowers in preference to any other pattern, and finish with damask, trimming with silk cord, tassels, &c.

There are few subjects on which more taste may be exercised then on these. A certain fullness approaching to largeness is desirable in the design; otherwise the pillow will be lost in the more massive attributes of the sofa itself.

Weight Cushions

These may be obtained ready-made, and afterwards covered with any variegated pattern of needlework. They are very useful.

Wire Baskets

These should be of silver wire, and worked in silk.

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This presentation of the Ladies Indispensable Assistant has been made possible by loan from Making Time costume design.

 

Click below to view other areas of

The Costume Gallery

Designer's HallThe CourtyardProduct PalaceThe Study

All contents of the websites associated with The Costume Gallery Website are protected by copyright laws. Questions??? contact: webmaster@costumegallery.com

© The Costume Gallery, 1997-1999.